1. Hello there guest and Welcome to The #1 Classic Mustang forum!
    To gain full access you must Register. Registration is free and it takes only a few moments to complete.
    Already a member? Login here then!

Shelby drop and lowering spring

Discussion in 'General Mustang Discussion' started by 67stang, Jun 16, 2017.

  1. Horseplay

    Horseplay Well-Known Member

    That looks really clean. Wonder how much is new metal. Not a fan of the fuel line with at least a couple unions in it though. I'd add that to my list.
     
  2. 67stang

    67stang Member

    That's one reason why I bought the car. I didn't want to mess with body work at this time, I wanted a car that runs but upgrades that I can do myself.

    Even though I will do the subframe in do time: was wondering if I should look into tractions bars first??? If I did any recommendations?




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  3. Horseplay

    Horseplay Well-Known Member

    The Shelby style work well for a lot of people or so I have read. I would save the money and put in the connectors. The affect it will have goes beyond just helping to control your wheel hop issue. You'll feel the benefit just driving around.

    You know, you could just stop trying to blister the tires every time you hit the road too!
     
    tarafied1 likes this.
  4. 67stang

    67stang Member

    It's hard not too when I have a 5 speed!!! Lol.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  5. 67stang

    67stang Member

    Just thinking (as I don't own a lift. Is it okay, and is there enough room, to keep the front wheels on the ground and jack up the rear keeping the jack stands on the axle?

    Actually I could jack up the front put 3 (2x6's) under each front tire, then place jack stands under the axel. Would that be okay?





    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2018
  6. Horseplay

    Horseplay Well-Known Member

    Just buy a second set of stands (anyone who works on cars needs at least a couple sets!). My car has spent the better part of the last decade up on four jack stands. Typically, two under the rear axle tubes and two under the front frame rails. If you get taller stands you can easily do just about any work you want under the car.
     
    RapidRabbit and msell66 like this.
  7. 67stang

    67stang Member

    Should I have weight on wheels before I weld?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  8. Horseplay

    Horseplay Well-Known Member

    Sorry, totally forgot this whole thing started as a conversation about installing subframe connectors! When I did mine, I put stands under both the front and rear frame rails, positioned just slightly off center near the front and rear, respectfully. My main concern was just that the car itself was resting level. That's the key thing. That the car is level and not being twisted. I felt it better to rest on the frame rails vs suspension so I had solid footing off which to get it all leveled. Because, after all, the suspension is mounted to the "frame" anyway.
     
  9. Midlife

    Midlife Well-Known Member Staff Member Moderator

    From all that I have heard, it is best to weld sub-frame connectors on the car with the car resting on its suspension. Why? That's the resting shape of the car in its natural position. Use of jack-stands may affect the resting shape if the floor is not level, if the jack heights are not exactly equal, etc.
     
  10. 67stang

    67stang Member

    What about these??? As I may still need traction bars!! These seem awesome!!

    [​IMG]


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2018
  11. Horseplay

    Horseplay Well-Known Member

    The purpose of connectors is to hold the frame together in a straight and level fashion. In the case of our cars, being unibody, the whole car is actually the frame. There is no issue welding the connectors in with the body on stands provided the stands hold the car level across both axis. Unless one grossly twists the car when jacking it up this method works well. If you are really worried about it, just get ramps and set the car up on those resting on the wheels. Really no difference as you need to make sure the ramps are level the same way as stands. Hell, lots of people weld on connectors using a rotisserie. That is how Tin Man shows doing installation in their vid.

    I used a water level (and some plywood shims) to get my stand heights all on the same plane and fired up the welder. Not planning on driving into space so I figured I could stop short of rocket science!
     
  12. Horseplay

    Horseplay Well-Known Member

    Those look to be very much like the classic Shelby style design.
     
  13. 67stang

    67stang Member

    Pretty cool as the traction bars bolt onto the subframe. But wow those traction bars and new sub frame connectors are exp!!!

    So what did you guys do with the fuel line any pics?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2018
  14. 67stang

    67stang Member

    Off topic: Sorry for all the questions: I want to also adjust the passenger window, it does not come up all the way 1/4 short. I know there are several adjustments but I don't know what each adjust screw does. Does anyone have a pic of what each adjustment screw does?



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  15. 3175375

    3175375 Well-Known Member

    Shop manual provides detailed description on how to adjust the door and windows. It is a step by step procedure.
     
  16. Horseplay

    Horseplay Well-Known Member

    On a 65/66 there are mechanical stops for window travel. I assume (but can't guarantee) the same on 67. Review the manual first so you don't start tweaking too many things at once and make matters worse. Not that I have ever done such a thing.
     
  17. Horseplay

    Horseplay Well-Known Member

    I made all my own SS (fuel and brake) lines for the car and routed along the frame rail on the inside. What caught my eye on yours were the multiple unions along the length. Not ideal as over time they could develop leaks. Ideally, you run a hard line from the pump all the way back to the tank with just a short flexible section between the tank and line. Although, it doesn't have to have a flexible bit and could be one straight run. Where I went from hard to a flex line up to my EFI I used AN fittings to couple the two pieces.
     
  18. 67stang

    67stang Member

    Okay.

    Seems like I have a lot to do. Hate having my car down, especially during this time of the year. I try and drive it as much as I can during the winter months in Fl! I may wait a few months. We will see. Keep you guys posted.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  19. 50 vert

    50 vert New Member

  20. Horseplay

    Horseplay Well-Known Member

    Have never seen them myself but they would appear to be beefy enough metal and if welded along the length to the floor I would guess they would be very effective. They MUST be welded that way though as they appear to be formed (bent) and an open channel type piece.
     

Share This Page