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Front brake pad replacement?

KBMWRS

Welcome truth back
Donator
OK......I want to check out my pads and possibly replace them.
1967 with original front discs, meaning factory not after-market.

I've done pad replacement on my BMW motorcycle, Corvette and F250 but those are all relatively newer type disc brakes. Not sure what to expect with a '67 version.
So is it just 2 bolts and pull the calipers off...the drop in new pads?

I'll check back in a few. Going to pull the car out and put it up on jacks and get started.
 

Aggiesrok

New Member
Make sure you’re loosening the correct bolts. There are 2 bolts nearby that connect the caliper halves, don’t use those. You may need to replace the rubber boots on pistons if it’s been forever.


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B67FSTB

The NorCal dude from Belgium
IIRC your 67 has Kelsey-Hayes calipers. I don't think you have to dissemble the hole caliper. Just 2 retainers and you can slide out the pads.
Minute 24 in this vid

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B67FSTB

The NorCal dude from Belgium
see minute 24 of how the pads go into the caliper .

Does your caliper have cross-over lines ?? which is kelsey-hayes calipers.
 

KBMWRS

Welcome truth back
Donator
Its the usual way I get to things. I worry and prepare for the worst.
So when I take the wheel off it is the KH type. Cover plates easily come off and I have good pads. So no reason to go further.
I did try to slide a pad out but although it would move and start to come out at the top the opening seemed slightly too small to get it out...the bottom jammed. So I left it in. No harm no foul. Cleaned the surrounding area and put everything back together.

Thanks guys.
 

B67FSTB

The NorCal dude from Belgium
Mike.
To slide out the pads , you have to push the piston back inwards the caliper.
To do so, you can put a screwdriver between the pad and disk and lightly pry/push against the pad so the piston goes back into the caliper.
The disk has probably an edge whats hinders you to slide out the pad.
always pry a pad against the piston so its sits max into the caliper , change that pad out and then you take out the opesite side.
 

msell66

Burning Fossil Fuels at c2
Donator
The KH pads are similar to mine. You just have to walk the ears out equally or they’ll bind up.

Yes, I see what I did there {.}
 

Horseplay

I Don't Care. Do you?
Donator
If its been quite a while since they were serviced it wouldn't be the worst idea to take it apart and lube up the moving parts and inspect the rotors for wear/a ridge. Local auto parts places like O'Reilly's can do them a quick turn to make like new. Look at the flex lines too for any signs of deterioration. Doing it yourself, brake service is a fairly cheap endeavor and worth doing every few years on a seldom used classic. Idle stuff tends to fail much more frequently.
 

Midlife

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Moderator
Mike.
To slide out the pads , you have to push the piston back inwards the caliper.
To do so, you can put a screwdriver between the pad and disk and lightly pry/push against the pad so the piston goes back into the caliper.
The disk has probably an edge whats hinders you to slide out the pad.
always pry a pad against the piston so its sits max into the caliper , change that pad out and then you take out the opesite side.
+1 on pushing the pistons back in. It may help to remove the master cylinder cover when doing so.
 

Aggiesrok

New Member
You’ve got to pull the calipers in order to turn the rotors or replace them. Most newer rotors are so thin to begin with, they need replacing each time you replace pads.


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