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2008 Mustang V6 clutch issue?

xmoweryx

New Member
New to the forum. Need some info. From what I gathered is these year models with t5 has a pretty clunky tranny.

My issue is I feel like I'm not getting the most out of my clutch pedal. I have to double or something triple clutch to get it in 1st or second.

Supposedly my car just has a new clutch put in about a year or 2 ago. It doesn't slip or anything. The pedal feel is just off like it's got air in the system. I tried parking on a hill and cycling the clutch to work air out of slave but it didn't seem to do much. Feels like it gets marginally worse once car is fully warmed up. Something 2nd won't engage and will keep me locked out for a while until I can force it in like it's bound up or something.

Planning on swapping tranny fluid but was wanting to know what else would be the problem with clutch not disengaging.

Periodically it feels like the clutch will drag when I press clutch in while coming to a stop because the rpms will drop to 500 then jump back up to idle


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Horseplay

I Don't Care. Do you?
You don't have a "slave cylinder" in this car but rather a hydraulic throw-out bearing. For reasons beyond me some people also refer to an internal hydraulic bearing as a slave too. Don't be one of those guys!

A slave cylinder is a hydraulic ram (for lack of a better term) that operates the old style mechanical throw-out system. The hydraulic bearing actually resides in the bellhousing and presses directly against the clutch fingers to disengage the clutch. It is a sealed, pressurized system. Parking up hill and pumping the pedal will not bleed anything. You either have to use vacuum to evacuate the system of any air via the master or crawl underneath and open up the bleeder and bleed it like you would brakes.

I suspect you are probably correct in thinking there is air in the system if, in fact, someone had changed the clutch recently. It's not hard to mess up bleeding a system like this and having some air bubbles end up causing a soft pedal.
 

xmoweryx

New Member
Thanks for info! I was told there was no bleeder on this car otherwise I would have tried doing so already. Do you know where it's located?

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Horseplay

I Don't Care. Do you?
Never done one of those myself (newish mustang) so can't say for certain. Every hydraulic bearing I have ever seen has an inlet and outlet (needed to function) typically hoses. It may be Ford simply used a bleeder fitting on the bearing inside the trans. The shop manual says to perform the bleeding via vacuum system at the master, FWIW.

I would get underneath it and see if there isn't a bleeder hose coming out of the bellhousing before I did anything else. Sorry I can't be more specific than that but it's simply a hydraulic system and needs to be bled free of air like any other. Just need to figure out the best means given your set-up and tools for the job.
 

Horseplay

I Don't Care. Do you?
So I spent a bit of time searching for a video to help you out and I'm sorry to say this is the BEST that I found. The others are similar but they are even worse in terms of the person demonstrating the technique. Good news is I think it is at least clear enough to show you what you need to do. He is using vacuum to draw any air out of the system as opposed to using a bleeder at the cylinder. It would seem this is the easiest and suggested method.

 

xmoweryx

New Member
Yeah I've watched that too. I can get a kit on Amazon to vacuum the system for like 50 bucks. I just wish Ford would have either separated the hydraulic systems or put a bleeder on the clutch line. Would make it a lot easier

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