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Paint removal suggestions

RapidRabbit

Well-Known Member
Hey guys, sorry this isn't mustang related but I trust your knowledge more here.

I have a project I've been working on restoring. It's an 87 jeep Cherokee.

So the previous owner said the paint clear coat was bad so he decided to rattle can the Jeep, poorly, with white primer. The original color is a dark burgandy.

I'd like to remove the white primer to get down to the original color and see what condition the body was in before doing a repaint. Can't paint over his crappy primer job.

What would you recommend?

Paint stripper

Sanding

Any particular products?



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Horseplay

I Don't Care. Do you?
Sanding is the best approach. If you use a stripper no telling how quickly it will get into deeper layers on the body. It would likely get through that rattle can stuff quickly and start eating into the underlying stuff before you could get it off. You should be able to sand off rattle spray easily.

I'd get a a couple types of rotary paint removing/sanding wheels for your drill or grinder and see how it goes.
 

Midlife

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Moderator
If it was rattle-can paint, laquer thinner should be able to remove the white paint easily enough. You'll still need to prep the underlying paint/body work for subsequent painting.
 

RapidRabbit

Well-Known Member
Thanks guys.

I am definitely going to prep for new paint in the spring. I just don't want any thing in between the original paint and the rattle can to cause peeling issues. There appears to be no prep before he painted it. He painted right over the rust spots. there's some surface rust areas I need to address as well.

I'm thinking of giving it a go at painting myself on this one. It's really just going to be a run around hauler and winter driver for me.

This is the original color.

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stangg

Well-Known Member
If you just want to get the rattle can paint off, and scuff / sand the base the factory original paint, then I think you would be better off with an electric 5-1/2 random orbit sander. Something like 80 grid paper should cut it down quick... 60 grit might be too aggressive. Lacquer thinner and a scuffing pad can sometimes be used to remove cheap rattle can paint from hard to reach places.

If you need to really get down to metal, then those cheap 7" sander / polishers that Harbor freight sells, along with 80 grit paper from Home Depot's rental center (next to their hardwood floor sanders) will make really fast work to remove several coats to get down to bare metal fast. I've been using this method for my current project and it really works very well - and it's cheap!. I would not use a drill unless you are only doing a small spot or two.

By the way, you shouldn't need to get all of the rattle can primer off before the repaint. While you do want to get as much of it off as you can, you will still want to spray a good coat or two of epoxy primer on to the body. The epoxy will seal off almost anything underneath that might react or bleed through the color coat.
 

Aussie67

Active Member
If you just want to get the rattle can paint off, and scuff / sand the base the factory original paint, then I think you would be better off with an electric 5-1/2 random orbit sander. Something like 80 grid paper should cut it down quick... 60 grit might be too aggressive. Lacquer thinner and a scuffing pad can sometimes be used to remove cheap rattle can paint from hard to reach places.
This >>>>>> Lacquer thinner and a scuffing pad can sometimes be used to remove cheap rattle can paint from hard to reach places or no more aggressive than a 120 grit. Rattle can stuff is so thin, it will come off easily. For best results use a wet 400 and add some dish washing liquid to the bucket of water. The washing liquid helps stop the paper sticking to the paint. Use a sanding block and not your hand. Sanding wet keeps the dust down but you will need to keep wiping it down with a wet rag as you go. Hose the residual off the floor once you're done, as its harder to remove once dry.

If you use an 80 grit, it will leave fine scratches that you will need to use a high build primer (spray putty as we call it) otherwise they will be seen in the final coat once it shrinks back during curing.

I would get as much off as I could, as the thinners used in the new primer will often react with the thinner rattle can paint.

Edit - Change the paper regularly when sanding.
 
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Horseplay

I Don't Care. Do you?
If the goal is to prep for a full repaint, you can forget about removing the rattle can stuff as a separate issue. That's going to happen anyway when you scuff the original finish for adhesion. Break out your orbital tool of choice and get after it sanding. I wouldn't go beyond 80 and even then that's likely too much for most areas away from any rust damage. It all depends on how the stuff comes off and if it is clogging up your discs too quickly.

And I agree with Stangg about an epoxy to seal it all up before you start over atop it. Lay that down, a good build, sandable primer next and you're almost ready for color. And by all means, paint it yourself. Plenty of inexpensive paint products you can use to keep the job to the cost of a quickie Maaco spray but yours will be better and you'll get the experience of your first paint job!
 

Aussie67

Active Member
When I painted mine, I used a rattle can primer to fix up various patches. Then used an isolator and all was good until the base coat went on.

Isolator.jpgReaction.jpg

Needless to say, after much re-sanding later.

Final.jpg
 
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