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Install a CD Player into a stock 1968 Radio Bezel

phlegm

Active Member
I'm sure that I am not the first one to do this, my 1968 Mustang Coupe needed better tunes. So on another forum I posted a want ad for a 'minimally damaged' radio bezel and another member sent me one for the price of shipping.

The one he sent me had been hacked for a standard 2-pole radio and painted with some sort of gawd aweful shiny black paint.


I started with a template measured and cut using the guidelines that came with the new radio, I created it in milimeters because that's what the instructions had.

I centered it on the face of the bezel, it barely fit, it is actually wedged a little bit, I should have trimmed the radio faceplate a little on the lower right and left corners. But I didn't, and nobody notices..

I skipped documentation on a few steps.. but first I marked the outline with an awl/scribe. Then I used a 1/8" drill bit to drill about a billion tiny holes just on the inside of the marked line. I followed that by using a coping saw to 'connect the dots'

I took the blade off the saw, then put it through the hole and then reattached the blade..

The process worked fairly well for getting the hole to be close to the final size, it wasn't perfect by any means

Another skipped step not documented.. I used a combination of files, both rat tailed and flat to smooth out the remainder of the surface to get this.

After a series of fitting attempts and filing, eventually the radio installation bracket fit nicely and I bent the tabs to hold it in place


Slid the radio into place and here's what the final project looked like.

Now I have CD player, can play MP3's from CD or DVD, bluetooth and a wireless remote. But I still can't hear a damned thing because I don't have a quiet enough cabin, and I blew out the speakers in the rear deck trying to turn it up loud enough...
 
Essentially what i did and i seldom if ever turn it on.... Isn't a coping saw for wood?

Nice write up and pictures!
 

Horseplay

I Don't Care. Do you?
"Fast68back" said:
Essentially what i did and i seldom if ever turn it on.... Isn't a coping saw for wood?

Nice write up and pictures!
I nice little tool like an oscillating saw would make quick work of that task.
 

phlegm

Active Member
Thanks!
"Fast68back" said:
Isn't a coping saw for wood?
Yes, yes it is a coping saw for wood, worked perfectly. My motto is, "Use what you got", and that's what I had.. Chalk it up to a poorly stocked shop, or a poorly planned project, either way.. it got done!
 

kb3

Well-Known Member
"phlegm" said:
Thanks!Yes, yes it is a coping saw for wood, worked perfectly. My motto is, "Use what you got", and that's what I had.. Chalk it up to a poorly stocked shop, or a poorly planned project, either way.. it got done!
+1 for ingenuity. I was thinking the whole time while I was reading/looking, damn my dremel tool would have made quick work of that!
 

Jonk67

Well-Known Member
I used my dremel to do mine but am horrible at controlling it so my edges were just as wavy, the face plate surround covers it anyway.





Jon
 

68EFIvert

Well-Known Member
I used an air auto body saw on mine. Then used a file to get it perfect. You did a great job and it turned out awesome!
 
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